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    TBA Music. Locally Grown. 2
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    Featured Artist
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    The Cooling Time
    The Cooling Time is a modern, visual heavy, melodic, dynamic rock band from Los Angeles. "Live, their lead guitarist, Eric Potter, drives you with his pedals to even stranger and satisfying sonic landscape." - L.A. Examiner

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    Paper Thin


    Artists
    Music Industry
    Songwriter

    Welcome Lauren Passarelli!

    Rob Harkness and Lauren Passarelli
    We are proud to welcome Lauren Passarelli to the Barn Productions community!  We are excited to have 50 of Lauren’s songs recently added to our licensing library.  Lior is already hard at work finding placements for these amazing tracks.

    Lauren came into town this week to attend
    Seth Swirsky’s 50th Birthday Party and she was nice enough to bring me along.  Seth, an established songwriter himself, had quite the gathering at his home in Beverly Hills.  Many of the upper-echelon of the music industry were present.  (Seth just finished a really cool Beatles documentary “A Year In The Life”, check out the trailer.)

    Lauren & myself had a great time at Seth’s!  We got to chat with former
    Wings guitarist & record producer, Laurence Juber, as well as Breakfast With The Beatles host, Chris Carter.  I met with both the President and Vice President of Sony Music Publishing (and will be meeting with them again next week!).  We got to have our picture taken by famous rock ‘n’ roll photographer, Henry Diltz (Crosby, Stills & Nash, James Taylor, Paul & Linda McCartney, The Doors… to name a few).  Star of the music-based TV show of the 60’s, The Monkees, Davy Jones performed a private concert for the party.  Then Lauren had an acoustic jam with Seth & Davy while the rest of the party sang along!  Could not have been more fun!!

    Lauren Passarelli has been a professor in the guitar department at
    Berklee College Of Music for the last 26 years.  What’s even more impressive is that Lauren became the first woman to graduate from Berklee as a guitar performance major in 1982.  Then in 1984, she became the first female guitar instructor at Berklee!

    Lauren is Berklee’s resident Beatles teacher; she teaches Guitar Styles Of The Beatles, The Berklee Beatles Ensemble and private guitar instruction to name a few.  I met Lauren when I enrolled in The Beatles Ensemble class my 4th semester at Berklee.  Lauren and I instantly clicked on our love of The Beatles’ music.  I believe Lauren also appreciated my attention to detail when it came to replicating The Beatles records to a T.

    Additionally, I proved myself a team player, as I performed three times in the ensemble (only once for credit) and I filled any role needed.  In all three semesters I played various instruments: rhythm guitar, lead guitar, bass, keys, drums, hand percussion - almost all while singing.  There were many songs I even had to switch instruments for different sections of the song.

    I was fortunate enough to have enough time to jam out on some Beatles songs with Lauren for old time’s sake.  I video recorded and multi-tracked the whole jam session.  I will post it up as soon as I’m done editing out all the boring stuff so keep an eye out for it!

    Suck it, Viacom!

    viacom

    Viacom has lost a milestone court battle against YouTube.  

    The (evil) conglomerate has been attempting to sue Google since 2007 for copyright infringement, claiming that YouTube has always been aware of copyright protected materials being posted by users and that it has, in fact, been using it to their advantage, knowing it generates spikes in traffic.


    The court disagreed, and rightfully so.  The court stated that as long as YouTube (or any user-posting site) implements reasonable takedown procedures when they become aware of infringing posts, they are not liable. Duh.


    Of course Viacom, with the backing of several Hollywood studios, intends to appeal the court decision.


    I have to say, YouTube is pretty good about yanking copyrighted materials.  I regularly find shells of video posts when looking for specific clips.  I think man other people have had this experience: search for a clip, find it in the listing, click on it, and… black screen with the message saying the video has been pulled due to copyright infringement.


    What more do the Hollywood studios want?  YouTube can’t possibly implement a way to preemptively stop users from posting any given copyrighted material (Google Future™ coming in 2012).  What the studios really want is for YouTube to cease to exist.


    Do all the major studios (movies and music alike) have retards running them or what?  Someone needs to tell them that the internet has arrived.


    The digital revolution is upon us; the old industry models for generating revenue no longer apply.  They just keep fighting, trying to hang on to this antiquated business structure and it is so clearly not working.

    What they should be doing is licensing the materials to sites like YouTube and making sure their content is easily found and is the best possible definition and fidelity.  If they did that, there would be no reason for YouTubers to post material that are already there.  Viewers would no look no further, especially when so many user posts have terrible video and/or sound quality.  


    If the studios did this, they would easily monopolize the YouTube views of the materials they own.  When you have millions of people watching your videos, there are tons of ways to make money.  License fees, advertising, product placements, sponsors.


    Furthermore, when viewers regularly watch your materials, you create fans.
    There’s tons of ways to make residual  income when you have fans. Merchandise, limited editions/special collections, live performances, to name a few.  For god’s sake, fans hold and attend conventions!!! This is another case of why dinosaurs must die.  Even Charles Darwin said, it’s not the strongest species that survive, it’s the species that is best at adapting.  I can’t understand how such powerful executives who should understand business can’t see how they aren’t adapting and how it will be their downfall.  

    How can they not see all these alternate methods to make money while others do?


    At this point the creative community just needs them to finally keel over so we can finally get on with the future.


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100624/media_nm/us_google_hollywood

    Words Of Wisdom From Thom Yorke

    My business partner, Anthony, just sent me this article, which I found very exciting! Thom Yorke summarizes the state of major record labels.  In short, they’re on verge of completely dying. This is very exciting for Barn Productions; it means we’re onto something… I think the one thing that article glazed over is that, despite Thom Yorke’s praise of DIY sales and marketing for artists, Radiohead would not have been nearly as successful if they had not had the full-force of a major label behind them when they started.  So there will always be some value in having some label support, especially for budding artists. However, eventually that “support”  can begin to feel more like a trap.  This was definitely the case in Radiohead’s scenario when they decided to walk away from EMI. This why I’m happy that our agreements are all non-exclusive.  So we offer the pros of a label, without the cons. Imagine that EMI hadn’t been gouging Radiohead so badly on their first several records.  Radiohead would likely have stayed with EMI indefinitely.  Now imagine that EMI was doing marketing and distribution *in conjunction* with Radiohead’s “pay what you want” campaign for their In Rainbows album, instead of being an *opposing* model. If that had happened, Radiohead would be happy (and rich), and both the band and EMI would be making money from both sources.  That’s basically what we do at Barn Productions.  It’s simply win-win.

    http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/17386/112454
    © 2010 Barn Productions